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412-370-4520 jen@jenworley.com

Portrait vs Headshot

 

We realize we’ve been throwing around the words Headshot and Portrait a lot recently, without defining either of them. While some people believe the names to be interchangeable, they are actually two very different forms of photography. Today we’ll give you a quick overview of some of the distinctions. 

  1. Photo Composition

    As we talk about photo composition, we are talking about how we place the subjects of the photo. Basically, how all of the visual elements are coming together.

    Headshots are close-ups on one subject. These photos tend to show one’s head and shoulders, along with a white, or neutral, background and not much more.  Usually shot in either a studio or onsite (ie. a business office), the purpose of the neutral background is to avoid any distraction in order make the subject stand out with an air of professionalism and confidence.

    Portraits on the other hand are usually further back, showing ¾ or full body images. The background tends to be more colorful and add to the story the photo is telling rather than just provide a neutral background. Portraits contain one subject, or many, such as a family portrait. They can be a little more complex to arrange, but as a Pittsburgh portrait photographer I am trained and have been doing them for years. I will help you create the perfect photo to tell your story. 

  1. Facial Expressions

    Facial expressions show different emotions, adding different tones, based on the goals of the photo.

In headshots, you want the subject to look approachable yet confident.  Our headshot photographers will help you find the facial expression that works for you in order to achieve this look.

When it comes to portraits, your facial expression might really be anything. Your goal would be to match the story you are telling with the photo. 

  1. Photo Purpose 

    The goals of the two photos are the biggest distinction. Here is where you will determine which type of photo is right for you. 

Headshots are created and used mainly for the use of business, to create an image for yourself. Where might you use them? Anywhere you are representing yourself, either as a brand, or your career.   

  • Company Website

  • Social Media Marketing platforms (Instagram, Facebook, twitter)

  • Business Cards

  • Professional profile pictures (Facebook, LinkedIn) 

  • Certain professions, such as i.e. actors, will use them as a part of a resume. 

Portraits are more so used as a storytelling method. They tend to get used in more creative environments, such as magazines. Portraits get used more frequently on a personal level as well. You might have them hanging in your house, or in a family album in your living room. 

 

jen worley photographer

Jen Barker Worley Photography
555 Grant Street, Suite 337 Offices at the William Penn Pittsburgh, PA 15219

https://jenworley.com
412-370-4520

Instagram post 18125680600212752 Marisa Corona, Pittsburgh Business Times' 30 Under 30 honoree, is a social media and digital marketer who has managed and built award-winning digital marketing content strategies for over 30 brands and organizations — from local businesses to nonprofits to health care to B2B and the world’s largest consumer packaged goods brands.

Marisa Corona, Pittsburgh Business Times' 30 Under 30 honoree, is a social media and digital marketer who has managed and built award-winning digital marketing content strategies for over 30 brands and organizations — from local businesses to nonprofits to health care to B2B and the world’s largest consumer packaged goods brands. ...

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Instagram post 17998829323337729 Had the privilege of taking Mr. Carnegie’s photo this week.  But he was a bit difficult.Old heavy ornate frame. He was under glass. In the corner of two small hallways. And I couldn’t control the lighting in the office- some stay on permanently.I thought I came prepared. Brought a large felt backdrop to block the light and the reflections it cast.  But it wasn’t solid enough.  Couldn’t completely block the light from the doorway on the same plain as the artwork, which then illuminated my tripod and me, as you can see in the glass.So I started playing around with cardboard that was laying around, which served the dual purpose of further blocking the diffused light behind the camera, and stopping the camera, tripod, and me reflecting off the glass.But it wasn’t big enough. And it took forever, as my shutter speed was at 25 seconds.  So Abby, who was the project leader doubling as my assistant (thank you Abby!) found a roll of Kraft paper, which we unfurled, both holding an end to cover a larger area… it was barely long enough to cover the width, so perfect!My psd file comprised of five images all layers then masked out to get me what I needed, and then I had to clone out my lens which was still to the left of Andy’s chin.Took about an hour on location, and then maybe 20-30 minutes in post.  But still less work (and risk!) than taking it off the wall, and taking it out of glass.#carnegie #carnegieheros
#pittsburgh #carnegieherofund

Had the privilege of taking Mr. Carnegie’s photo this week. But he was a bit difficult. Old heavy ornate frame. He was under glass. In the corner of two small hallways. And I couldn’t control the lighting in the office- some stay on permanently. I thought I came prepared. Brought a large felt backdrop to block the light and the reflections it cast. But it wasn’t solid enough. Couldn’t completely block the light from the doorway on the same plain as the artwork, which then illuminated my tripod and me, as you can see in the glass. So I started playing around with cardboard that was laying around, which served the dual purpose of further blocking the diffused light behind the camera, and stopping the camera, tripod, and me reflecting off the glass. But it wasn’t big enough. And it took forever, as my shutter speed was at 25 seconds. So Abby, who was the project leader doubling as my assistant (thank you Abby!) found a roll of Kraft paper, which we unfurled, both holding an end to cover a larger area… it was barely long enough to cover the width, so perfect! My psd file comprised of five images all layers then masked out to get me what I needed, and then I had to clone out my lens which was still to the left of Andy’s chin. Took about an hour on location, and then maybe 20-30 minutes in post. But still less work (and risk!) than taking it off the wall, and taking it out of glass. #carnegie #carnegieheros #pittsburgh #carnegieherofund ...

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